Categories
Apple

Ideal Apple Watch thickness

Yesterday, I posted a graphic comparing the thickness of the newly-announced Apple Watch Series 3 to its predecessors. With each generation (from the first gen Watch to Series 2 and from Series 2 to 3), the Watch has grown thicker. It’s not hard to see why; the power demands of GPS (for the Series 2) and a cellular radio (for the Series 3) required larger battery sizes.[1]

But what if physics didn’t apply? If internal component size weren’t a constraint, how thin would you want the Apple Watch to be? In prepping the comparison above, I made a few assumptions:

  • Again, this is fantasy land. I ignored the problematic stagnance of lithium-ion battery tech. My ‘ideal’ Watch wouldn’t last you through the day. It might not even make it to lunchtime.
  • The various external Watch components (band grooves, side button, and Digital Crown) retain their current dimensions. I’ve adjusted the band groove angles to reflect a shallower attachment angle, which might break legacy band compatibility.
  • You could shave off another millimeter or so without shrinking the Digital Crown. But I worried about potential friction between the Crown and the user’s skin, hence the extra depth on bottom.

Suddenly (and unfairly), the Series 3 looks a bit chunky, doesn’t it? ■


  1. The 42mm Series 2 Watch has a 34% larger battery than the 1st generation (2015) version.  ↩


Categories
Tech

“Apple’s Battery Suppliers Use Cobalt Mined by Child Labor”

From Amnesty International:

Major electronics brands, including Apple, Samsung and Sony, are failing to do basic checks to ensure that cobalt mined by child labourers has not been used in their products

If true, this report paints the entire industry—not just Apple—in a shameful light. But as I’ve written before, Apple is uniquely positioned to address such injustices:

Maybe it’s unfair to expect Apple to shoulder the cost of responsible manufacturing. But the truth is that no other company is in a position—financially or philosophically—to effect such a change.

As consumers, we also bear some responsibility here. Too often, we’re content to ignore the unjust systems that deliver the latest iPhone or laptop to our doorstep.

But what if we told device makers that we valued human life over battery life? Would you be willing to boycott unjust practices—and forgo your biannual iPhone upgrade? Let’s assume that Apple upped its vigilance over the supply chain, then baked the cost of that oversight into its device prices. How much extra would you pay for a “conscience-friendly” iPhone?